Leading Spanish art critic Sebastià Gasch
on Puigmartí's 1st exhiwrote obition in 1956:
“The concept of human suffering, of man as a bundle of thistles, that is, of nerves, of veins, of tensed muscles, all bound to be hurt and to painfully defend them selves, informs the lines of the faces and bodies...”
“Pathetically bringing to life what in other painters is nothing more than inert matter, the colouring in these canvases brims with flesh and blood, pain and pessimism”.
“... Puigmartí is first and foremost a painter, an all-around painter. He has an innate feel for the material”.
“He searches for the anti-curve, where the skin is scorned and the soul is sought”. A more favourable beginning would have been impossible."
Fellow artist Juan-Eduardo Cirlot
wrote on Puigmartí's break through exhibition in 1960:
“In these crosses of varying degrees of clarity and relief, Puigmartí was able to harmonise the needs of the material and the needs of the symbol. His future work will show us the potential of images, either opening them up toward ever clearer content, or closing them into a gradual technicality as seems to be insinuated in some of the paintings exhibited by the artist on this occasion."
"... the series as a whole, with its indubitable critical nature, signals a significant movement in the rise of an aesthetic that declares itself as falling between the passion of the cavernous backgrounds, still illuminated, and the clarity of the orthogonal cross”.
Fellow artist Alberto del Castillo
wrote on Puigmartí's break through exhibition in 1960:
“The cross, in this sense, is not a symbol, nor is it even a figure; it is simply a means of organising the composition. But beyond the approach and the solution, with its consequent distressing atmosphere, lies the treatment of the material, this dense, coarse impasto applied generously using the spatula, and later burned with metal and a blowtorch, more or less crushed to achieve the variety of reliefs that in each case makes the exact proportion of the chiaroscuro an obsessive enigma, all of this in earth tones, barely altered by whites and greys which underline the opulent material’s look of calcified rock and evokes in the viewer strange primogenitors.”
The famous art critic Lourdes Cirlot
on Puigmartí's work:
He embraced everything... “With its clearly nihilistic conception of the world, informalism reflects a profound restlessness, yet despite this, it attempts, albeit desperately, to cling to something tangible: the material of the art work.”
Art critic Carlos Areán
has these comments on Puigmartí's technique (1962):
“The material emerges as pasty, lumpy openings that condense three-dimensionally in the areas of gloomiest tension.”
Art historian, Francesc Miralles
on the historic importance of Puigmartí:
"In Sweden in 1971 Puigmartí made a series of erotic series of erotic drawings which paved the way for a subject matter in which Puigmartí would make more than one historical contribution to art."
On Puigmartí's work in the 60 Vicenç Llorca
underlined the fact that...:
“Puigmartí, a self-taught painter and rebel against classifications and games of influence, holds a dialogue, although perhaps he is not overly aware of it, with this great tradition in Catalan painting (eyes in Romanesque painting; the eyes in Miró’s paintings) and settles within this tradition with a vernacular full of strength and nuances. The head and the eyes are the figurative elements that more and better unify an oeuvre that is uneven, sometimes even unyielding, yet also original and impressive.”
Famous art critic Alex
wrote in the art magazine Los sitios 30 January 1974:
“There is surely an erotic charge in each of his works, but it is of such refinement and elegance that it never prevents us from spiritually enjoying his creations, so full of complicated combinations in such a proportion as if they had been excerpted from an bottomless wellspring of dreams.”
“They are such perfect drawings – sometimes they give the sensation of being real marble – that perhaps their sole defect might be this inevitable, fatal perfection. There are unlikely shadings, unexpected combinations always from the geometric point of the woman as a starting point, as a path and place of return. In this passage across the woman, in all its variable and almost inconceivable combinations, hitching a ride on the artist’s prodigious fantasy, one feels transported to a dreamlike, unreal world, one that is thus personal and unique to the artist who creates his offspring in his own way and as he pleases.”
Puigmartí
on painting women:
“When I paint, I like to convey an updated interpretation of women. We live in a society where sex is broadly exploited. The basic difference between sexual exploitation and erotic art lies in the artist’s sensibility and talent. If the artist’s imagination and technique are permanently captured in the work, then the artist successfully translates his thoughts and observations into visual meanings.”
Puigmartí
on erotic art:
“By looking at erotic paintings by contemporary artists, we can hope to understand some of our sexual frustrations as well as our satisfactions. The insight of the 20th century artists can help us to explore our own potential. Erotic art raises our awareness and helps us, as human beings, to see more deeply within ourselves. I like to pique the viewer’s curiosity. By searching for a new vision of sensuality, the magic of creation leads us to take power.”

Josep Puigmartí and Alberto Oliveras in Cadaqués

Puigmartí with a young woman in Cadaqués

Josep Puigmartí

Josep Puigmartí

Josep Puigmartí